How we get more Does than Bucks born from our Goats

There’s no doubt about it, when it comes to dairy goat breeding most everyone is looking forward to their bred does giving birth to doelings not bucklings. Many consider a successful season if they have at least half doelings born. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a “successful” year each year? Is there really a way to affect the outcome of your kidding?

Triplet does!

Just a few less bucks please

It is true that you need bucks to reproduce, but not all bucks born should be left intact. It seems that too many bucks are available to be used for breeding so unless that buck has superior genetics, it should be wethered.  have only ever owned one buck, for just 2 years, and I don’t think that I want to own another.

Doe kids are worth more money than wethers, and are much easier to sell. If my Saanen gives birth to a purebred doe, I can expect to get several hundred more dollars from her than from a wether. Unfortunately many people have mostly bucks born each year, and not enough does to sustain a herd.

Twin doelings!

7 years – 77% does!

Yes, that is my average of does born in the last 7 years! We have had 6 different does on and off and have bred to 5 different bucks. Let’s look at a chart of our results:

Year doesbucks
1Buck 160%40%
2Buck 250%50%
3Buck 2100%
4Buck 350%50%
5Buck 3100%
6Buck 480%20%
7Buck 5100%

Is it science or luck?

The buck determines the sex of your kids, but a lot of other factors are involved. We always make sure that our does are healthy and in good weight. Some people believe that extra weight on the does is not good at breeding time, but I like my animals fat and sassy (or at least fleshy and fun!) My does get fed quality hay and grain all year. My first-time does are usually just about 9 months old when they are bred and are plenty fleshy. I have not had any problems getting and of them bred.

I usually borrow a buck to use for breeding, housing them in a separate pen at my house for about 6 weeks. One year I took my does to someone’s house. Incidentally it was the year that I had the most bucks born. I usually breed during the month of December, right around Christmas.  This may seem late to some people, but I prefer to have my kids born in May.

When the buck arrives at my house, I do not keep him with my does. He goes into a separate, secure pen that is next to them. He is fed well and everyone is monitored closely. When a doe comes into heat I take her to the buck, making sure that she has been in heat for a few hours first. There will be lots of blubbering and flirting through the fence, but wait awhile before you take her in. She should be in standing heat and ready for him. When they are done, she will be more than ready to go back to her own pen.

It may not seem like much, but I believe that these two things are necessary for increasing your does born: breeding your does at a later time in the year and not allowing the buck to breed her right away. The theory is that male sperm are not viable for as long as female sperm. I don’t know if it’s exact science, but it seems to work for us. I will continue to breed in this fashion and see what results we continue to get. If you would like to try this method, I would love to hear about your results!

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